Inbound Marketing Specialist - Job Description, Qualifications & Salary Data | Digital Media Jobs

Inbound Marketing Specialist Job Description

What is Inbound Marketing? In its simplest form, Inbound Marketing is the passing of information, but when applied to the Digital Marketing Jobs space, Inbound Marketing refers to any form of marketing that creates demand for a product or service via traffic generation. The trick with inbound marketing is that a good inbound marketer should know how to earn their way into a customer’s awareness rather than paying for it directly.

As an Inbound Marketing Specialist, your goal is to attract qualified prospects at the right time and via the right channel so that you can convert them into leads and customers.

Inbound Marketing jobs are crucial to the marketing mix and inbound marketing professionals have a lot of the same responsibilities of other traditional marketers, including managing digital create assets (images, videos, written content, websites, webpages, landing pages, etc.), and using these assets to generate qualified leads.

Inbound Marketing best practices combine analytical thinking and creative execution, using whatever method required to generate attention for products and services, pushing targeted consumers into the company’s sales pipeline. Consumers tend to be far more apt to purchase when they experience marketing content that informs, rather than interrupts, and this is precisely what inbound marketers learn how to do effectively.

Inbound Marketing is typically carried out via content marketing, social media marketing, search engine optimization, email marketing, branding and other mediums of communication, and for our purposes, it’s all handled digitally (online). An Inbound Marketing Specialist wears different hats in order to maximize the digital presence of the brand or product they represent, whether they’re working at an in-house destination, or via an advertising agency.

As an Inbound Marketing Manager, you can expect to create, manage, and execute multi-channel marketing campaigns that leverage different strategies to drive customer acquisition. Inbound Marketing Managers must understand how specific inbound marketing activities turn leads into customers and continue to refine their process to maximize results, testing different solutions, then spending their limited budgets and time on the most effective strategies on a case-by-case basis.

Inbound Marketing Specialist Qualifications

Typical Education Requirements:

  • A./B.S. in Marketing, Business, Communications, or related field

Inbound Marketing jobs typically require at least an undergraduate degree in a related field of marketing, business or communications.

Any of these fields will greatly help your chances of breaking into an Inbound Marketing career because employers want to know that their candidate is comfortable with both marketing and advertising concepts.

Furthermore, a communications degree is acceptable. As an Inbound Marketing Consultant or Manager, you are likely to be working alongside a team of talented individuals who specialize in their respective areas (SEO, PPC, Display, Social Media, etc.).

Preferred Skills

  • Interpersonal communication
  • Public Speaking
  • Content Writing
  • Data–Driven & Analytically-Minded
  • Creative Thinking
  • Ability to work in a fast-paced environment
  • Specific experience in SEO, SEM, Social Media, Blogging, etc.

These skills are crucial for Inbound Marketing careers because you will be dealing with a variety of teams (or wearing a variety of different hats) throughout the course of any given single campaign.

Additionally, every move that is made by an inbound marketer must be driven by data/analytics, so it’s a great idea to have some proficient knowledge in these tools and fields: Hubspot, Google Analytics, SEO, Social Media and Email Marketing.

It is extremely important to have extensive knowledge of Google Analytics, as this is perhaps the most important platform for any inbound marketer, since it provides the ability to analyze tests, determine winning strategies, and interpret the results of inbound marketing campaigns.

If Google Analytics isn’t one of your strong suits, we highly recommended attempting to become certified by visiting the Google Analytics Academy.

Inbound Marketing Specialist Career Outlook

The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) projects that employment for marketing managers are projected to increase 10%, “Faster than average”, meaning job growth from 2016-2026 is expected to see explosive growth, but this includes all types of marketing, and we would anticipate inbound marketing to grow at a faster than average rate as more and more companies turn to the online channel for lead generation purposes.

The realm of digital marketing is ever-changing, since technology has a monumental impact on this field. As an inbound marketer, trends to look out for include: mobile marketing, videos, spam filters and the accessibility of analytical data.

Inbound marketing strategies must remain cutting edge, which requires regularly following the latest and greatest technology innovation, as well as consumer trends.

Inbound Marketing Specialist Salary Expectations

National salary averages based on job listing keywords (Francil & Moz, 2015) conclude                       Inbound Marketing at $84,000.

Glassdoor reports the average annual base pay of an Inbound Marketing Specialist at $50,390. 

The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) reports the Median Annual Salary for Advertising, Promotions and Marketing Managers at $129,380, or $62.20 per hour.

Suffice to say, there’s no consensus on the average pay of Inbound Marketers, and the rate can change drastically depending on experience, and especially, results.

References:

 

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